Exhibition explores forced removals in Constantia

Exhibition explores forced removals in Constantia
The exhibition explores Constantia’s history linked to apartheid forced removals with a focus on the people.

The Constantia Heritage and Education Project (CHEP) is hosting a free exhibition during Heritage Month at Groot Constantia wine estate, to the right of Jonkershuis Restaurant.

The “Hidden Rivers” exhibition is a culmination of years of oral history work and creating a network of Constantia’s dispersed community split up by the Group Areas Act, according to Chep founding member and director Dr Claire-Anne Lester.

The exhibition is a collaboration with the Centre for Curating the Archive, Iziko Museums, Christ Church Constantia and photographer and cinematographer Kent Andreasen. It explores Constantia’s history linked to apartheid forced removals with a focus on the people. It can be viewed between 10am and 3.30pm, from Monday to Sunday.

Chep was launched on Heritage Day in 2016 with a memory walk initiated by former Constantia residents forcibly removed under the Group Areas Act. The NGO was formally registered in 2018 and is led by former and current Constantia residents.

Groot Constantia spokesperson Lila Jutzen said the estate is a living museum that preserves the history and cultural legacy of the South African wine industry and we are excited to welcome the Constantia Heritage and Education Project’s “Hidden Rivers” exhibition, which will add to the diverse and authentic experiences presented for visitors to the farm.

Images at the exhibition depict experiences related to home, displacement and memory, or connection to land and place.
The exhibition includes more than 50 archival images sourced from families’ personal collections.